Comic-Con is here! Comic-Con is here! It's like Christmas, but the religion is your favorite fandom. And it's heeeeeeere.

I write this from the airport as I wait to be transported to San Diego, and not going to lie, I'm not sure if I'm more excited or intimidated. I've tried to get into San Diego Comic-Con for years, and now that I'm finally on my way, I hardly know what to do with myself.

Except cosplay. Obviously, when one Comic-Cons, one cosplays. (See a teaser of what I'm cosplaying as here.)

Beyond that, it's about all I can do to read up every newbie and 2017 guide, and hope that this event does not plow right over me and flatten me into the cement.

If you want to follow along from home (or are similarly cramming in preparation, like I am), here are the best resources I've found so far:

San Diego Comic Con: Your Complete Guide, Rolling Stone

A great look at the top anticipated highlights, broken down my franchise.

These Panels Will Bring Fans to Their Feet at SDCC 2017, Forbes

This article breaks down the major events by category, rather than company. Quite helpful. (And yes, Hall H is a category.)

Comic-Con 2017: You Don't Need a Badge for These 12 Fun Events, San Diego Tribune

If you want to hang out but couldn't snag a pass, this is the list for you.

Your Complete Guide to Comic-Con 2017, SDCC Blog

The official event's guide, with more links than you will ever be able to read.

Comic-Con 2017: 10 Things to Watch, San Diego Tribune

The hottest film and TV teasers at the show. Tough choices were made, but someone had to do it.

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To say that  Greece had some of the most breathtaking, stop-walking-and-stare moments of my life would just be silly, because Greece is well known for this trait. (Just check Pinterest.)

But I have to say it, because I may never get over it--not just how beautiful scenes caught me off guard, but how frequently it happened. We're talking every few steps.

Nothing makes me relax like being near water. Water this incredilby blue and clear was awe-inspiring. If you ask me, as a writer, if you're not taking time to clear your mind and seek out inspiration, you're simply not doing your job.

From that perspective, I worked so friggin' hard on this trip, you guys. So. Hard.

So for today's Greek Week post, I wanted to share a few of those moments, even if my amateur no-filters photography can't come close to doing it justice. Enjoy!

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So! If you get my newsletter or follow me on Twitter or Facebook, you may have heard. I went to Greece.

Greek mythology was the first mythology I learned, and I fell in love right away. The stories were just so strange, and the monsters were incredible. They blew open my imagination in new directions, and it plays a big role in how I write.

So a trip to Greece was high on my travel wish list. (And hey, who doesn't love a good beach?)

The trip was incredible! To share it with you, I'm posting pictures of my favorite moments all week.

Let's start with some classics--top ruins from Athens.

Temple of Zeus

Or at least, what's left of the Temple of Zeus. So many of the buildings from ancient times are still in incredible shape, it can start to feel like it's nothing special. I loved the Temple of Zeus because its partially-standing columns are a beautiful reminder of what an incredible thing it is that anything is left standing at all, thousands of years later.

The Carytids

Slipped right in with the rest of the majesty (and hoards of tourists) in the Acropolis, these four lady sculptures-turned-columns blew me away. There's ionic, doric, and corinthian ... and then there's this. Who are these ladies? My mind craves a story to go with them.

Socrates's Jail

This is where the actual Socrates was brought and jailed before his execution. A little morbid, I guess, but standing on that same ground had power about it. The philosopher has become just a big, vague concept to me. Standing at a place he was known to have been, too, made him incredibly real.

Hope you enjoyed these glimpses into my trip. More to come!

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Next week, I have a short story coming out as part of a collective called The Alvarium Experiment, around the theme of Masters Revisited. 

For the collection, each author is taking a classic work of fiction and putting a speculative fiction twist on it. I chose Jane Eyre.

Jane finally found her happily ever after. But can she remain content as the ghost of Mr. Rochester's first wife haunts her? In this reimagining of Jane Eyre, Bertha has a dark secret she must share, leaving Jane to choose between her independent mind and her soul's yearning for love.

Doesn't this cover just give you chills? The Alvarium Experiment's Charles Cornell really captured the story's tone perfectly.

Jane Eyre is more than a story to me. It's a mirror. Every time I pick it up, my assessment of Jane as a character, her life's events, and her unusual relationship with Mr. Rochester leaves me unsettled in a different way than the time before. Thus, reading about Jane also tells me how much I have changed since the last time.

Which made it all the more fun to play with for this story. What do you think of Jane Eyre?

More details to come as the release nears!

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Next week, I hop on a plane to the other coast and hit up San Diego Comic Con. For the first time ever. Hello, yes, long time fan, first time attendee.

I’ve heard the tales of those who have traversed to this grand event before me. I’ve done the roundups and tracked the round-the-clock coverage of the madhouse of sneak peeks and teaser promos and best panel moments. Even from afar, this event is overwhelming.

So please, give me your geek wisdom:

  • How does one get the most from SDCC?
  • How does one take care of oneself and avoid burnout?
  • What do you wish you’d known before going to your first SDCC?
  • And I’d especially love any tips you’ve got on attending as a Creative Professional—how do I get the most from it?

Share your wisdom! Enter below in the comments.

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With a two-week trek through Greece the centerpiece of my month, I've got mythology on my brain this month. Mythology has always captured my imagination in a unique way. Something about those naughty, all-powerful gods and those incredible, larger-than-life monsters.

Greek mythology is the set of mythical stories I learned earliest in life, and it has a special place within my imagination (if you want proof, just read Mud). In fact, it was a major driver behind my desire to go to Greece in the first place.

I promise, pictures and stories from my actual trip are coming very soon! But in the meantime, behold this list of my very favorite contemporary novels inspired by Greek mythology, over at Book Riot.

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Hey readers. Hope your summer is off to a great start. I have big plans for travel and lounging by the pool--how about you?

What do all my summer activities have in common? They require a huge pile of books to read.

If you're looking to pad your TBR in prep for summer, I've got just the thing. I've teamed up with several other sci-fi/fantasy authors, and we're all giving away a book for free, including my Third Realm Wars novella, Rain.

Get free sci-fi & fantasy books here

And hey, real friends tell friends about giveaways--why not share Rain and more with your friends? Tweet this.
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1. Medusa is one of the Gorgons.

Gorgons are winged human females with a hideous face and living venomous snakes in place of hair. So if you are aware of Medusa, this should sound familiar.

2. She is the granddaughter of the Earth (Gaia) and the Ocean (Oceanus).

Kinda cool, right?

3. And her parents are Phorkys and Keto, god and goddess of the sea, who represented the seas dangers.

Bonus fact: Ketos also refer to sea monsters.

4. Medusa’s gaze turned men to stone.

Some versions of the myth say this is because of her monstrous ugliness; others because of her incredible beauty.

5. She has two sisters, Sthenno and Euryale.

Medusa was the only mortal of the three. As far as I could find, there is no explanation for this, so I figure it’s kind of like how some of us are just born muggle and others get to be wizards.

6. Medusa’s monstrous form was said to be punishment from Athena for seducing Poseidon.

Of course other versions say Poseidon raped her, so … victim blame much?

7. It’s said her monstrous character followed, as the world turned against her.

A pre-Frankenstein's monster, if you will.

8. In her despair, Medusa fled to Africa.

As she wandered, snakes dropped from her hair. This is how Africa got its venomous reptiles. Still no explanation for Australia.

9. Medusa was ultimately beheaded, of course, by Perseus.

Her sisters tried to avenge her, but Perseus dodged them  by using Hades’ cap, which made him invisible.

10. Perseus, classy guy that he was, continued to use the head as a weapon.

Even after her death, Medusa’s head retained its ability to turn people to stone. Eventually Perseus gave it to Athena, who placed it on her shield.

11. And then she became a symbol.

In classical antiquity, Medusa’s head came to appear on the Gorgoneion, which was an evil-averting device. Not a bad ultimate legacy, albeit from a pretty rough life.

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Wonder Woman releases today!

As the raving reviews start pouring in, a wave of supplementary reading has released across the web too

To celebrate, I’ve rounded up some of my favorites.

Enjoy! And be sure to go see Wonder Woman this weekend!

Everything You Need to Know About Wonder Woman Before Seeing the Film

75 Years of World-Saving: Everything You Need to Know About Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman's Unwinnable War

With Wonder Woman, DC Comics Finally Gets It Right

Wonder Woman Saves the Day, Crushes Stereotypes

Reading Pathways to Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman Saves the Day, Crushes Stereotypes

Wonder Woman’s Gal Gadot and Chris Pine Role Reversal

Remember That Time When Wonder Woman Was A U.N. Ambassador?

Before Gal and After Lynda: All the Stars Who've Played Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman Day on Saturday Means Big Deals and Freebies!

Share your own favorite Wonder Woman article in the comments 🙂

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As demonstrated so very recently by La La Land, artists do tend to enjoy the occasional deep dive into their own wallows.

A writer myself, I’m a total sucker for it. The highs and lows that come with artistry expose our internal quirks and vulnerabilities like nothing else.

Writers are far from impervious to the occasional navel-gazing whim. Here are a few of my all-time favorite books that indulge in some intense navel-gazing.

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