Next week, I have a short story coming out as part of a collective called The Alvarium Experiment, around the theme of Masters Revisited. 

For the collection, each author is taking a classic work of fiction and putting a speculative fiction twist on it. I chose Jane Eyre.

Jane finally found her happily ever after. But can she remain content as the ghost of Mr. Rochester's first wife haunts her? In this reimagining of Jane Eyre, Bertha has a dark secret she must share, leaving Jane to choose between her independent mind and her soul's yearning for love.

Doesn't this cover just give you chills? The Alvarium Experiment's Charles Cornell really captured the story's tone perfectly.

Jane Eyre is more than a story to me. It's a mirror. Every time I pick it up, my assessment of Jane as a character, her life's events, and her unusual relationship with Mr. Rochester leaves me unsettled in a different way than the time before. Thus, reading about Jane also tells me how much I have changed since the last time.

Which made it all the more fun to play with for this story. What do you think of Jane Eyre?

More details to come as the release nears!

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Next week, I hop on a plane to the other coast and hit up San Diego Comic Con. For the first time ever. Hello, yes, long time fan, first time attendee.

I’ve heard the tales of those who have traversed to this grand event before me. I’ve done the roundups and tracked the round-the-clock coverage of the madhouse of sneak peeks and teaser promos and best panel moments. Even from afar, this event is overwhelming.

So please, give me your geek wisdom:

  • How does one get the most from SDCC?
  • How does one take care of oneself and avoid burnout?
  • What do you wish you’d known before going to your first SDCC?
  • And I’d especially love any tips you’ve got on attending as a Creative Professional—how do I get the most from it?

Share your wisdom! Enter below in the comments.

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With a two-week trek through Greece the centerpiece of my month, I've got mythology on my brain this month. Mythology has always captured my imagination in a unique way. Something about those naughty, all-powerful gods and those incredible, larger-than-life monsters.

Greek mythology is the set of mythical stories I learned earliest in life, and it has a special place within my imagination (if you want proof, just read Mud). In fact, it was a major driver behind my desire to go to Greece in the first place.

I promise, pictures and stories from my actual trip are coming very soon! But in the meantime, behold this list of my very favorite contemporary novels inspired by Greek mythology, over at Book Riot.

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Hey readers. Hope your summer is off to a great start. I have big plans for travel and lounging by the pool--how about you?

What do all my summer activities have in common? They require a huge pile of books to read.

If you're looking to pad your TBR in prep for summer, I've got just the thing. I've teamed up with several other sci-fi/fantasy authors, and we're all giving away a book for free, including my Third Realm Wars novella, Rain.

Get free sci-fi & fantasy books here

And hey, real friends tell friends about giveaways--why not share Rain and more with your friends? Tweet this.
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1. Medusa is one of the Gorgons.

Gorgons are winged human females with a hideous face and living venomous snakes in place of hair. So if you are aware of Medusa, this should sound familiar.

2. She is the granddaughter of the Earth (Gaia) and the Ocean (Oceanus).

Kinda cool, right?

3. And her parents are Phorkys and Keto, god and goddess of the sea, who represented the seas dangers.

Bonus fact: Ketos also refer to sea monsters.

4. Medusa’s gaze turned men to stone.

Some versions of the myth say this is because of her monstrous ugliness; others because of her incredible beauty.

5. She has two sisters, Sthenno and Euryale.

Medusa was the only mortal of the three. As far as I could find, there is no explanation for this, so I figure it’s kind of like how some of us are just born muggle and others get to be wizards.

6. Medusa’s monstrous form was said to be punishment from Athena for seducing Poseidon.

Of course other versions say Poseidon raped her, so … victim blame much?

7. It’s said her monstrous character followed, as the world turned against her.

A pre-Frankenstein's monster, if you will.

8. In her despair, Medusa fled to Africa.

As she wandered, snakes dropped from her hair. This is how Africa got its venomous reptiles. Still no explanation for Australia.

9. Medusa was ultimately beheaded, of course, by Perseus.

Her sisters tried to avenge her, but Perseus dodged them  by using Hades’ cap, which made him invisible.

10. Perseus, classy guy that he was, continued to use the head as a weapon.

Even after her death, Medusa’s head retained its ability to turn people to stone. Eventually Perseus gave it to Athena, who placed it on her shield.

11. And then she became a symbol.

In classical antiquity, Medusa’s head came to appear on the Gorgoneion, which was an evil-averting device. Not a bad ultimate legacy, albeit from a pretty rough life.

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Wonder Woman releases today!

As the raving reviews start pouring in, a wave of supplementary reading has released across the web too

To celebrate, I’ve rounded up some of my favorites.

Enjoy! And be sure to go see Wonder Woman this weekend!

Everything You Need to Know About Wonder Woman Before Seeing the Film

75 Years of World-Saving: Everything You Need to Know About Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman's Unwinnable War

With Wonder Woman, DC Comics Finally Gets It Right

Wonder Woman Saves the Day, Crushes Stereotypes

Reading Pathways to Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman Saves the Day, Crushes Stereotypes

Wonder Woman’s Gal Gadot and Chris Pine Role Reversal

Remember That Time When Wonder Woman Was A U.N. Ambassador?

Before Gal and After Lynda: All the Stars Who've Played Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman Day on Saturday Means Big Deals and Freebies!

Share your own favorite Wonder Woman article in the comments 🙂

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As demonstrated so very recently by La La Land, artists do tend to enjoy the occasional deep dive into their own wallows.

A writer myself, I’m a total sucker for it. The highs and lows that come with artistry expose our internal quirks and vulnerabilities like nothing else.

Writers are far from impervious to the occasional navel-gazing whim. Here are a few of my all-time favorite books that indulge in some intense navel-gazing.

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I always enjoy a peek into another author or reader’s list, and I was recently chatting up some comics recommendations on Twitter, so it felt like a nice time to draw out this conversation more and share my comic books pull list.

Personally, I love stories that go big, with a bent toward the strange and absurd. It’s just what comics to do best, in my opinion.

I am also a big believer that comics are for everyone—it’s not just capes and mutants! No matter what you enjoy, there is a comic for you--beyond superheroes, there is also a lot of action, thriller, romance, and even literary graphic work out there.

I’ve never gotten into the biggest superheroes in comics (though I’m a sucker for them on screen). This is in large part because the universes of these stories, particularly DC and Marvel heroes, tend to be so massive I, a) don’t know where to start, and, b) am not sure I want to get sucked in to that level. So I’ll pick up the major cape graphic novels, but otherwise, I stick to the fringes a bit more.

Here are my current favorites.

Saga, Brian K. Vaughn and Fiona Staples

A classic Romeo and Juliet story, taken into an alternate universe space opera, where the lovers get married, start a family, and must learn to survive on the run while being pursued by agents on both sides of an ongoing war.

Every single character is given depth and shades of gray, with an eye toward heavier topics like the cost of war.

Also, the MOST amazing alien illustrations. THE MOST.

The Walking Dead, Robert Kirkman, Charlie Adlard and Cliff Rathburn

The comic book is just different enough from the TV show to keep you on your toes, but similar enough that if you love one, you’ll love the other.

Sometimes horrifying and other times cheesy in a “What About Beaver” sort of way, this comic explores the brightest and darkest corners of human nature.

Bitch Planet, Kelly Sue Deconnick and Valentine De Landro

First of all, I want to BE Kelly Sue Deconnick. Seriously. Look her up. But girl-crush aside, Bitch Planet is a revolution.

In this world, noncompliant women are shipped off to a prison planet where they are safely confined and can’t disrupt a heavily patriarchal society. Speaking your mind and breaking out from the norm condemned as acts of rebellion. And if you pick it up by single issues, each one comes with a feminist essay in the back.

This comic has meant so much to fans that the NC (noncompliant) mark has become a popular tattoo, and it’s definitely on my own list for future inking.

Paper Girls, by Brian K. Vaughan (again), Cliff Chiang and Matt Wilson

Set in the 1980s and following the adventures of four pre-teen girls who are breaking the glass ceiling as the first female newspaper deliverers, a simple world is quickly twisted around in an absurd and delightful time-travel adventure. Get ready to be confused. You know, in a good way.

Beyond this, the coloring and illustration of this story is just too cool. Check out these covers. Also, more cool monsters.

Concluding note: Just now realizing how Image Comics-heavy my reading is. Promise, no one paid me to write this.

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One of the big questions I wrestle with as I continue to write the Chronicles of the Third Realm Wars series is, where the hell are the gods?

Much like in our real world, Terath's gods can often seem distant and even apathetic in the face of great danger, horrors and tragedy. Do they just not care? Are they even paying attention?

These questions are woven throughout the books because they are constantly within me.

Maybe this is why, as I suddenly realized a few weeks ago, so many of the books I love also put questions about the gods and their engagement with our world front and center.

Over at Book Riot, I've compiled a list of them. If you love American Gods and its strange tale of a deity-level power shift, you'll get as much theological wrangling from these tales as I have.

Read the article here.

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If you love books, and you love authors, and you like meeting authors and getting books, well boy, do I have some awesome events for you.

And hey, guess what? I'll be there. I'll have copies of my books for you, some awesome swag to give away, and I'll even be presenting a couple times.

Plus I've got a special giveaway goodie for those who buy both Mud and Rain.

So how about I tell you about the actual events.

RT Book Lover's Convention, Atlanta, May 2-7

This event last year was the most intense reader fandom experience I have witnessed (granted, last year it was in Las Vegas, which may have added to the atmosphere). But if you love reading, especially genre fiction, and especially romance genre, this is your scene. There's also a writers' track for all the authors in attendance.

Find me:

  • Thursday, May 4, on the Fighting & Frenching panel at 1:30 p.m, where we'll talk about how to craft compelling action and romance.
  • Saturday, May 6, at the Giant Book Fair, where I'll have books, goodies, and a special gift for anyone who buys both Rain and Mud.

Literary Hill BookFest, May 8, D.C.'s Eastern Market

This an annual event takes place at Capitol Hill's awesome Eastern Market and celebrates D.C.'s local authors. So come on out and support some local talent!

Find me: 

  • 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Eastern Market at my booth. My books will be sold through the Capitol Hill Book Shop on site, and I'll be there to talk about them and sign them, if  you like. Again, I'll have swag and goodies to pass out.
  • 2:30 - 2:50 p.m. at the Eastern Market presentation stage, I'll be giving a short talk and reading about the Chronicles of the Third Realm Wars and how it came to be. Bring your questions!

See you there, readers!

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